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Poyekhali - Off We Go by markkarvon Poyekhali - Off We Go by markkarvon
By 1961 the science of rocketry and space flight had advanced to the point that it was feasible a man could make the journey beyond Earth's atmosphere into space. Although several manmade satellites had successfully achieved orbit by this time, it was not an absolute certainty that manned space flight would succeed. On April 12, 1961 Yuri Gagrin bravely entered his Vostok I spacecraft perched atop an R-7 rocket. Upon blast off he spoke over the intercom, "Poyekhali!" which translates in English to, "Off We Go!" After a short journey Yuri Gagarin become the first man to fly in space. The flight lasted a total of 108 minutes and he completed one orbit of the Earth. It is interesting to note the design to land the capsule safely with a man on board had not been perfected at the time of the flight. Thus, after the capsule reentered the atmosphere, Yuri was ejected and parachuted to a safe landing separate from the capsule. This print is a tribute to this magnificent accomplishment on the 50th anniversary of the historic flight.
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:iconskrainev:
SKrainev Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2011
Goog job! Thanks for the "VOSTOK 1".
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thank you.
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:iconexplorer793:
Explorer793 Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2011
Once again, fabulous portrayal! Although I've heard from many legitimate sources that Gagarin may very well not have been the first man in space. The Soviets definitely have had failures in their space program from way back then that, even today, haven't been disclosed, and I wouldn't be surprised if they lost a few cosmonauts during their initial attempts at spaceflight.
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thank you. There may have been an earlier cosmonaut but for now I paint factual representations according to the historical record. I'll leave the speculation up to the conspiracy theorists.
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:iconhukt0nf0nikz:
hukt0nf0nikz Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2011
amazing, a fine tribute!!
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thank you very much.
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:iconstokeman:
stokeman Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011
Off we go......hmm, it does sound pretty good. It's business-like yet easy going sounding at once
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:iconkogr:
KOGR Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2011
Nice work.
hey Yuri's night in coming up!.. this tuesday... be sure to watch First Orbit!
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks. I know, I did the piece as a 50 year commemorative print.
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:iconaltimeter:
Altimeter Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2011
i posmotrem (& see)
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:iconshenanigan87:
shenanigan87 Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2011  Hobbyist Photographer
Even though it was the result of rivalry between superpowers, I think it's also one of humanitiy's greatest moments. The only greater one to me was the first lunar landing, with the photographs the Astronauts took of our earth creating a sense of unity that was rarely felt in those times. It's tragic to see that the first rockets that touched the outskirts of space were made to bring death and devastation, but it's also magnificent what has been achieved with that technology in the long run. Would our forefathers have ever thought about us having a manned, permanent outpost in space?
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:icontanker22052:
tanker22052 Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2011
Excellent work as always!
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks.
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:iconeyepilot13:
eyepilot13 Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Cool!
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks.
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:iconeyepilot13:
eyepilot13 Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Anytime!
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:iconzarem:
Zarem Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
And here it is, your wonderful tribute to human space expansion. I love it when you lift up in space it ceases to be one nation's success and becomes Humanity's one, with no exclusion. And even thou it is considered to be of Russian origin, I always see it as of the Earth instead.

I love to consider 12 of April as my 'professional holiday', at least by my education - I studied Space Physics and Ecology at my university. We had Vladimir Dzhanibekov as one of our honorable staff, he visited us on every special occasion and lead the Summer school every year. It is really easy to tell that this man was out there - seeing Earth from above changes you somehow, and it could be seen from all of his stories and his viewpoint. It was really great.

So, what I want to do - is to THANK you for this piece. For tributing the flight, for capturing the moment and for rendering our beautiful Earth in such a marvelous way.
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thank you very much. I am happy you like the piece.

Your comments about Vladimir Dzhanibekov are intersting. It seems to be a universal truth about almost all those who have been selected to carry humanity forward into space.
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:iconkrigl:
krigl Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2011
Great as always and a very interesting fact about the ejection... what a ride! Brave indeed!
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thank you.
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:iconladyaliceofoz:
LadyAliceofOz Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2011  Professional Artisan Crafter
Nicely done! :clap: :winner:
:shh: I'm old enough to actually remember that! :ohmygod: :faint:
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks Alice.
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:iconladyaliceofoz:
LadyAliceofOz Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2011  Professional Artisan Crafter
You're very welcome Mark! :hug:
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:icondisasterdesigner:
disasterdesigner Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2011   Photographer
When I think of what was going through his head while being up there for the first time ever! My dad had a chance to meet Major Gagarin in person and he told me that you would never say that he was the first human to travel to space. He asked him (in a spirit of the Socialist Brotherhood) how is it like to be a real Soviet Hero (my dad is Polish). He said that officially he is the proudest member of The Party but his heart stayed in space
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
That is really cool your dad met him. Thank you for sharing that.
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:iconlyle462:
Lyle462 Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2011
Beautiful!
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks Lyle. I tried to capture the baeuty of the view from orbit while also bringing across the feeling of the solitary man in a small capsule high in orbit above the rest of the wrold.
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:iconlyle462:
Lyle462 Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2011
Mission accomplished buddy. You hit this one out of the park.:)
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:iconkaranua:
karanua Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Sweet! Very little notice it seems is given to these rather excellent first steps into human space endeavour. Mores the pity considering the innovation that went into them.
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks Dave. It is fascinating to learn about those early steps. In an era where roughl half of all rocket launches in the world failed or malfunctioned in some way, those first spacefarers were really brave. It is very fascinating to me to read about how men tackle the problem of manned spaceflight. It was and still supremely challenges mankind on many levels from engineering to biology to sociology.
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:iconherrdrayer:
HerrDrayer Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2011  Hobbyist Photographer
Every time I read about Vostok 1, the American authors make a big fuss over the fact that Gagarin was "merely a passenger." So what? He trained just as hard as the "Original 7," and he would have had to do some "flying" had the ground-based guidance system failed, which it didn't. Whether the ship was under the control of a person on board or a crew on Earth is irrelevant in the light of the flight's accomplishment. Furthermore, it's daft to think that the Mercury flights took place without any help from Houston. It's sad that Cosmonaut Gagarin didn't live to celebrate this day.
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
The fact that the flight was controlled from the ground does not take away from the achievement in my opinion. It was done that way largely for safety reasons. By all accounts Yuri was an excellent pilot. There was provision for him to take control of the craft should the need arise and he was definitely the right man for the job.
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:iconherrdrayer:
HerrDrayer Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2011  Hobbyist Photographer
We are agreed then. :) It just made me a bit indignant that American commentators emphasized Gagarin's passenger status in some childish attempt to make it feel less significant than Shepherd's suborbital hop or Glenn's first orbit.
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Of course. I think Yuri's flight is something to be celebrated as a magnificent achievement. Why else would I take the time to glorify it in art?

I could be wrong but between your last comments on my Saturn V piece trying to glorify the Energiya above the Saturn V and your comment this piece, it seems you have a chip on your shoulder against America. I am giving you the benefit of the doubt and assume it for the sake of intellectual conversation rather than to provoke.

I celebrate the achievements of all mankind through my artwork no matter their race, creed or politics. In my piece before the Saturn V I paid high tribute to the Russian Soyuz spacecraft. I have portrayed machines of America, Nazi Germany, WWI Germany, England, the Soviet Union and Russia.
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:iconherrdrayer:
HerrDrayer Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2011  Hobbyist Photographer
Nah, I don't have any sentiments against America. It's only for friendly and intellectual debate. I don't envy the political situation going on there right now though. :) I've just gotten the impression from some of the books and TV programs I've read about the space race, that the authors and/or commentators were too biased towards America. I might have said it before, that I'm very sad Energiya didn't get the chance to develop, as it had the potential to unseat the Saturn V as the most powerful rocket built had it ever been launched with a full complement of boosters. In fact, construction of the ISS would have been faster and cheaper had the heavy lifting been shared between the space shuttle and Energiya launches.

I'm glad I live in a time where the Americans, Russians, and Europeans (and more) are working together in space. I think it's awesome that there are American rockets launching on the thrust of Russian engines, and that there's no longer any need for a docking adaptor to make Soyuz ships compatible with US ports. I'm sad that NASA lacks the funds to replace the Shuttle, but Soyuz will continue to do what it has done so spectacularly.
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:iconcherishedmemories:
CherishedMemories Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2011
Awesome! How beautiful the earth looks from space.
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks Cheri.
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:iconeagle1division:
Eagle1Division Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Fun fact I read just awhile back - the Russians didn't put the first satellite in orbit. A few months before they launched Sputnik, a small piece of metal was blasted into orbit by an underground nuclear weapons test by the U.S.

Somehow, though, I guess the first manmade satellite into orbit isn't quiet as grandeur when it was an accident... :D
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
The rumor says it was actually a manhole cover. There is no proof it ever happened. There is supposedly a ball bearing floating around out there from a V-2 rocket as well - again unsustantiated rumor.
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:iconunstung:
Unstung Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2011  Hobbyist Photographer
Great tribute. This April 12th is also the 30th anniversary of the shuttle.
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks.
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:iconenterprise206:
Enterprise206 Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2011  Hobbyist Photographer
i wonder how the earth looked back than?
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Blue.
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:iconblakk:
blakk Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2011
nice work, I remember I had this 72 scale model when I was a child
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks. I remember it too. I also had the Apollo-Soyuz model.
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:iconblakk:
blakk Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2011
Apollo-Soyuz model was made from paper in my childhood ;)
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:iconfocallength:
focallength Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2011
Nice work.
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:iconmarkkarvon:
markkarvon Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks.
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:iconfocallength:
focallength Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2011
You're welcome.
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